Time bias online

1980 (392,000,000)
1981 (358,000,000)
1982 (326,000,000)
1983 (336,000,000)
1984 (358,000,000)
1985 (397,000,000)
1986 (388,000,000)
1987 (425,000,000)
1988 (399,000,000)
1989 (446,000,000)
1990 (586,000,000)
1991 (525,000,000)
1992 (590,000,000)
1993 (601,000,000)
1994 (654,000,000)
1995 (1,020,000,000)
1996 (1,030,000,000)
1997 (1,040,000,000)
1998 (1,080,000,000)
1999 (1,500,000,000)
2000 (2,040,000,000)
2001 (1,590,000,000)
2002 (1,890,000,000)
2003 (2,260,000,000)
2004 (2,580,000,000)
2005 (3,350,000,000)
2006 (5,090,000,000)
2007 (4,660,000,000)
2008 (379,000,000)
2009 (156,000,000)
2010 (196,000,000)
2011 (97,600,000)

The figures above (from February 12 2007) show the time bias online, the relative overrepresentation of recent years on the Internet. The beginning of the 1990s, the end of the Cold War. In 1995 the Internet started to grow, the year 2000 was the second millennium (so the number = a bit higher) and 2004/2005 saw the beginning of what is known as Web 2.0 (or the growth of UGC). I expect the number for 2007 to be about 7,500,000,000 by the end of the year.

Erger/Beter (2007)

Erger/Beter (2007)

ergergergergergergergergergergergergergergergerg
Het wordt steeds erger

maar het ergst wordt het nooit
want het kan en gaat ook beter

De betekenis verandert (2007)

De betekenis verandert (2007)

Schrijf geen rare verhalen
over woorden zonder kwalen
woorden zijn altijd ambigu,
dat staat vast
(en blijven weleens steken,
wanneer ze het andere oor uit gaan)

(160)

Miscellaneous remarks (I) (2007)

I wish I would’ve integrated the things I learned earlier in my life.
But then again, would that outweigh the whole process through which I acquired these things?

Wishful thinking is just what it is: wishful thinking.

Integration takes time.